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Carlyle Brown

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Core Writers 2008 //  Core Writers 2009 //  Core Writers 2012 //  Core Writers 2013   

Carlyle Brown is a writer/performer and artistic director of Carlyle Brown & Company based in Minneapolis, which has produced The Masks of Othello: A Theatrical Essay, The Fula From America: An African Journey, Talking Masks, Are You Now Or Have You Ever Been… and Therapy and Resistance. His plays include The African Company Presents Richard III, The Little Tommy Parker Celebrated Colored Minstrel Show, Buffalo Hair, The Beggars' Strike, The Negro of Peter the Great, Pure Confidence, A Big Blue Nail, Dartmoor Prison and others. He has received commissions from Arena Stage, the Houston Grand Opera, the Children's Theatre Company, Alabama Shakespeare Festival, Actors Theatre of Louisville, The Goodman Theater, Miami University of Ohio and the University of Louisville. He is recipient of playwriting fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, National Endowment for the Arts, McKnight Foundation, the Minnesota State Arts Board, Jerome Foundation, Theatre Communications Group and the Pew Charitable Trust. Mr. Brown has been artist-in-residence at New York University School of the Arts Graduate Acting Program, The James Thurber House in Columbus, and Ohio State University Theater Department where he directed his music drama, Yellow Moon Rising. He has been a teacher of expository writing at New York University; African-American literature at the University of Minnesota; playwriting at Ohio State University and Antioch College; African American theater and dramatic literature at Carlton College as the Benedict Distinguished Visiting Artist, and "Creation and Collaboration" at the University of Minnesota Department of Theater. He has worked as a museum exhibit writer and story consultant for the Charles Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, and the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage in Louisville, Kentucky. Mr. Brown is a core alumnus of the Playwrights' Center in Minneapolis and he is an alumnus of New Dramatists in New York. He has served on the board of directors of The Playwrights' Center and Theatre Communications Group, the national organization for the non-profit professional theater and is a member of the board of the Jerome Foundation. He is a member of the Charleston Jazz Initiative Circle at the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture at the College of Charleston in Charleston, South Carolina where his works and papers are archived. He is the 2006 recipient of The Black Theatre Network's Winona Lee Fletcher Award for outstanding achievement and artistic excellence, a 2008 Guggenheim Fellow, a 2010 recipient of the Otto Rene' Castillo Award for Political Theatre, and 2010 United States Artists Friends Fellowship.

www.carlylebrownandcompany.org

Search for published plays by Carlyle Brown...

Finding Fish

Description

Part of the Ruth Easton New Play Series

In the future, food is scarce and the oceans have been depleted of fish. But one fisherman on the Maine Coast keeps bringing in the catch. Could his luck have anything to do with his strange new wife? The people in power would do anything to find out, especially “The Committee,” who has sent the fisherman’s brother to reel him—and his secrets—in. Brown, himself a former sea captain, probes tough questions about sustainability through the lens of one family’s struggles.

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Director: Noël Raymond
Dramaturg: Barbara Rose-Brown
Video designer: Kevin Obsatz
Cast: John Catron*, Stephen Yoakam*, Jen Blagen*, Terry Hempleman*, Jodi Kellogg
* Member of Actors' Equity



Nobody, No Time

Description

It's February 25, 1922—the last night in the life of celebrated Negro entertainer Bert Williams. In a break between performances, Bert regales his longtime assistant with songs and stories and finds himself confronting his own legacy of a career built on the exploitation of Negro stereotypes. Nobody, No Time is a play with music that looks inside one of the most complex and conflicted figures in the Vaudeville era.

Director: MARION MCCLINTON

Composer: VICTOR ZUPANC           

Featuring PATRICK BAILEY, BRIAN GRANDISON, TIMOTHA LANAE, FORREST MCCLENDON, THOMASINA PETRUS and BRIAN ANTHONY WILSON

 



Dartmoor Prison

Description

The incipient cause of the War of 1812 was the impressments of American seamen from American vessels by the British Royal Navy to supply Britain's urgent need for man power in its war against Napoleon. Thousands of American sailors refused to fight on British war ships and they were taken to a prison on a bleak and desolate Devonshire moor called Dartmoor. At least a third of the American prisoners were Black sailors and when they entered into Dartmoor's stone walls they immediately divided themselves by race. Housed and segregated in prison yard number 4 the Black prisoners take control of the internal prison market demanding respect and autonomy and within the prison walls Americans, Black and White are in a constant state of war.

Workshop December 7-9 -Public Presentation Dec. 9 at 3PM

The incipient cause of the War of 1812 was the impressments of American seamen from American vessels by the British Royal Navy to supply Britain's urgent need for man power in its war against Napoleon. Thousands of American sailors refused to fight on British war ships and they were taken to a prison on a bleak and desolate Devonshire moor called Dartmoor. At least a third of the American prisoners were Black sailors and when they entered into Dartmoor's stone walls they immediately divided themselves by race. Housed and segregated in prison yard number 4 the Black prisoners take control of the internal prison market demanding respect and autonomy and within the prison walls Americans, Black and White are in a constant state of war.



Down in Mississippi

Description

Three College students, an African American man, a white woman and a white man go down to the dangerous world of Mississippi in 1964 to register Mississippi Negroes to vote. Along the way they discover that they have to change themselves in order to change the world. A Gospel play with music, Down in Mississippi explores the heart of the Civil Rights Movement.



Abe Lincoln and Uncle Tom in the White House

Description

Workshop November 16-17

Public Reading: Tuesday, November 17 - 3pm

Workshop November 16-17

Public Reading: Tuesday, November 17 - 3pm

In 1862 Abraham Lincoln on the verge of signing the Emancipation Proclamation is visited in the Oval Office by the character of Uncle Tom from the novel "Uncle Tom's Cabin" by Harriet Beecher Stowe.



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